Two Poems

by Marie Silkeberg, translated by Kelsi Vanada

Marie Silkeberg is a Swedish poet, translator and poetry filmmaker living in Stockholm. Since her first book appeared in 1990, she has written eight collections of poetry, including 23:23 (2006), Material (2010) and, with Ghayath Almadhoun, Till Damaskus (2014). Atlantis (2017) is her newest book, and her most recent translations into Swedish are works of Inger Christensen and Claudia Rankine. She has taught, among other places, at Gothenburg University and the University of Southern Denmark.

Kelsi Vanada’s first translation, from the Spanish, is The Eligible Age by Berta García Faet, published in 2018 with Song Bridge Press; Toward Muteness is forthcoming from Veliz Books. She holds MFAs in Poetry (Iowa Writers’ Workshop, 2016) and Literary Translation (University of Iowa, 2017). She writes poems, translates from Spanish and collaboratively from Swedish, and works as Program Manager of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA).

Marie Silkeberg’s hybrid essay “Zero Meridian” from her book Atlantis (Albert Bonniers Förlag, 2017) begins “blood—your life depends upon lying close.” This evocative first line sets the tone for the rest of the piece, as a second-person narrator based in northern Europe asks readers to question how you respond if you’re in the position of being adjacent to someone experiencing not-belonging. In this case, concise lines of narrative in a stripped “zero language” that feels like—in the essay’s own terms—dread—tell of the narrator’s friend’s brother’s uncertain journey across the Mediterranean. The two friends hang in the vertigo of suspense-time as they receive fragmented news from “M” as to his current whereabouts.

Interspersed throughout this narrative, and often dominating it, runs the constant ticker-tape of language from sources as distinct as Edgar Allen Poe’s “A Descent into the Maelstrom” to Ma Jian’s Beijing Coma to Peter Galison’s “The Refusal of Time” to Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark. What if you know that people are living through war or are trying to escape it, but you’re not living it yourself, and you feel powerless to make any real change? Maybe you keep lying close. Maybe you keep reading and thinking, interrogating violence and whiteness and time itself—and hope. “He is the event that alters place,” Silkeberg writes.

“Bárðarbunga” was first published in Swedish on a webpage for the Norwegian Writers’ Climate Campaign, and this poem’s ties to ecopoetics are evident. But it also has much in common with “Zero Meridian”—in it, too, an unnamed narrator is suspended in time, waiting for the occurrence of one natural phenomenon even as the traces of the destruction of another natural process, the 2014-2015 eruption of the Icelandic volcano Bárðarbunga, are omnipresent. In this poem, the narrator finds herself one person among many, all travelers of diverse backgrounds, all seemingly hoping to find an answer to some deep question in the beauty of geysers, lava fields, and the northern lights—the wild natural setting contrasting sharply with the “devastated city” in the Middle East which the narrator holds always in mind. It’s a poem under pressure—the pressure of one continental plate on another, but also of people of different cultures or ethnic groups on one another. “Can you see it?” the captain of the boat asks the narrator, pointing to the spot where he knows the aurora borealis are shining. “A white cloud. Barely. / Maybe,” she replies, uncertain.

—Kelsi Vanada


“Zero Meridian” by Marie Silkeberg,
Translated from the Swedish by Kelsi Vanada

 

 

 

blood—your life depends upon lying close

 

 

 

Your flesh and spirit are still alive, buried inside the coffin of your skin.

 

 

I stepped onto Changan Avenue, and saw the long wall of green soldiers again. Everything was green: the soldiers, the tanks behind them, the buildings on either side. The sky was green, and the sun was greener still…My skeleton was shaken by a bolt of pain. I’d been struck too…Hot, sticky blood poured down my face. My hand reached out to touch my head, but couldn’t find it…

 

 

Early morning. The sun hasn’t even risen. Its rays are visible over the western mountains.

 

 

“We are now,” he continued, in that particularizing manner which distinguished him—“we are now close upon the Norwegian coast—in the sixty-eighth degree of latitude—in the great province of Nordland—and in the dreary district of Lofoden. The mountain upon whose top we sit is Helseggen, the Cloudy.”

 

 

 

You feel the morning chill.

Still no word from M.

On the evening of the 14th he went weak. Sick. To the prison on Rhodes.

After an eight-hour bus ride from Istanbul to Izmir.

And then further south. A boat took him to Rhodes. The island of the butterfly valley.

 

 

Summer twilight. Time: a dim point in the first decade of this unpopular century. Place: latitude 59° north from your equator, 100° east from my writing hand.

 

 

You remember the butterflies as a huge fluttering sensation of colors.

 

 

 

As the old man spoke, I became aware of a loud and gradually increasing sound, like the moaning of a vast herd of buffaloes upon an American prairie; and at the same moment I perceived that what seamen term the chopping character of the ocean beneath us, was rapidly changing into a current which set to the eastward.

 

 

And then many years later. The boat you rode in while he slept on your knee.

You sat in the stern. Listened to the motors.

Didn’t understand it was a second seeing until you reached the middle of the valley.

 

 

Even while I gazed, this current acquired a monstrous velocity. Each moment added to its speed—to its headlong impetuosity. In five minutes the whole sea, as far as Vurrgh, was lashed into ungovernable fury; but it was between Moskoe and the coast that the main uproar held its sway. Here the vast bed of the waters, seamed and scarred into a thousand conflicting channels, burst suddenly into phrensied convulsion—heaving, boiling, hissing—gyrating in gigantic and innumerable vortices, and all whirling and plunging on to the eastward with a rapidity which water never elsewhere assumes except in precipitous descents.

 

 

sick

everything hanging still in the

air

 

 

The feeling of the singing of the real world.

If only I could catch the feeling of the singing of the real world.

 

 

The sun’s edge now fully lost. But darkness hasn’t fallen yet.

 

 

Here lies the real, hard-core difference between latitude and longitude—beyond the superficial difference in line direction that any child can see: The zero-degree parallel of latitude is fixed by the laws of nature, while the zero-degree meridian of longitude shifts like the sands of time.

 

 

No sms to say he’s heard from M. He said three days you say on the phone.

Don’t start worrying until tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

Oh no…our world is only a bad mood of God, a bad day of his.

Then there is hope outside this manifestation of the world that we know?

Oh plenty of hope, an infinite amount of hope—but not for us.

 

 

Dense fog over the mountains.

 

 

March 4. To-day, with the view of widening our sail, the breeze from the northward dying away perceptibly, I took from my coat-pocket a white handkerchief. Nu-Nu was seated at my elbow, and the linen accidentally flaring in his face, he became violently affected with convulsions. These were succeeded by drowsiness and stupor, and low murmurings of “Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!”

 

 

 

No moon this evening. No stars.

 

 

 

On Saturday September 28, 1889, representatives from eighteen countries gathered in Sevres, outside Paris. They were there to bring the world under the measure of a single meter known as M, and a single kilogram represented as K, to give their blessing to a particular ruler and weight…

 

 

The stone fortress. A feverish thought.

 

 

At 1:30 p.m. that afternoon, the officials loaded the “chosen ones,” M and K, into a triple-locked vault. At that moment, M and K, two of the most precisely forged and measured objects in history, the most individually specified human-made things, became, in burial, the most universal. What had been measured now defined the meter. M as one meter, no more, no less. From it, every other length in the world took its measure.

 

A sudden fatigue hits you again.

 

Documentary. A slice of your orange.

 

As if the body cannot wake up to the body’s time.

 

Most of all, they wanted to standardize time. From a master clock in the control room of the Paris observatory itself, situated on Rue du Télégraphe, pipes carried pulses of air—that is, pulses of time—under the streets to reset clocks throughout the city…

 

Twilight. Only a narrow streak of sun left.

 

 

…the British system of undersea cables to link clocks around the nation’s vast empire. When a cable reached the shores of Recife in Brazil, Emperor Pedro II came down to the beach to witness the arrival of European time. Time synchronized to the globe’s zero point, the Royal Observatory in Greenwich.

 

 

The crickets start up.

 

 

But the never-ending expansion of the time-unification zone continued. Cables snaked under the sea down the West Coast of Africa, landing at the colonial capitals, like Dakar. It crossed the seas and headed up into the Andes, wound down into Haiphong Harbor…Everywhere that telegraph lines could reach, the time signals did, too. Time, weight and length began to cover the globe: a planetary machine that would bring the world under one ticking clock.

 

 

You wake to the message that M is now on a boat.

Released from the Rhodes prison. Arriving soon at Piraeus—the port of Athens.

 

 

 

Never shall I forget the sensations of awe, horror, and admiration with which I gazed about me. The boat appeared to be hanging, as if by magic, midway down, upon the interior surface of a funnel vast in circumference, prodigious in depth, and whose perfectly smooth sides might have been mistaken for ebony, but for the bewildering rapidity with which they spun around, and for the gleaming and ghastly radiance they shot forth, as the rays of the full moon, from that circular rift amid the clouds which I have already described, streamed in a flood of golden glory along the black walls, and far away down into the inmost recesses of the abyss.

 

 

You hear the rooster.

 

 

March 22. The darkness had materially increased, relieved only by the glare of the water thrown back from the white curtain before us. Many gigantic and pallidly white birds flew continuously now from beyond the veil, and their scream was the eternal Tekeli-li! as they retreated from our vision.

 

 

Three motorcycles drive by.

 

 

Hereupon Nu-Nu stirred in the bottom of the boat; but, upon touching him, we found his spirit departed. And now we rushed into the embraces of the cataract, where a chasm threw itself open to receive us.

 

 

In the evening an uncertain dread crawled over you.

 

 

 

But there arose in our pathway a shrouded human figure, very far larger in its proportions than any dweller among men. And the hue of the skin of the figure was of the perfect whiteness of the snow.

 

 

 

That he would get stuck in a camp.

 

Forced to have his fingerprints taken.

 

 

These images of impenetrable whiteness need contextualizing to explain their extraordinary power, pattern and consistency. Because they appear almost in conjunction with representations of black or Africanist people who are dead, impotent, or under complete control, these images of blinding whiteness seem to function as both antidote for and meditation on the shadow that is companion to this whiteness–a dark and abiding presence that moves the hearts and texts of American literature with fear and longing.

 

 

The clock’s heart he says.

The sun’s.

 

Anyone in the northern hemisphere could pick out their latitude—how many degrees south of the North Pole they were just by observing the North Star. But longitude—how far east or west one was from a reference point (like London or Paris) was much harder. Since the earth rotates, in order to establish how far east or west you were, you needed to simultaneously compare the stars above you with the stars above your reference point.

 

 

That’s why hope must lie outside of “ourselves”

we must recover a connection

to the material world

even to ourselves

 

 

 

 

You drove through the darkness on the mountain roads.

 

 

After a little while I became possessed with the keenest curiosity about the whirl itself. I positively felt a wish to explore its depths.

 

 

 

 

Volcanic ash he says. The black stone. The streaks.

 

 

 

M’s eyes. Tired. Red-rimmed. Wide-open. In the photo he shows you.

 

 

 

How in societies as a presentiment of great convulsive events a formless vacuum can arise, moldable into anything—now will come a time of total lack of coherence, no words answer any longer to their previous connotations, time has opened like an abyss, everything slides, everything is a dark and disorderly flowing stream whose speed only increases, but without destination; rubble and splinters whirl over the darkness. What the maelstrom of the darkness actually contains, no one can tell.

 

 

Old.

Old some two thousand years or more.

The oldest living things.

You’ve never been here before?

No.

What do you think?

… people who were born and have died when the trees went on living.

Their true name is Always green. Ever living.

I don’t like them.

Why?

 

Somewhere here I was born. And there I died. It was only a moment for you.

You. You took no notice.

 

Madeleine…

Madeleine. Where are you now?

Here with you.

Where?

Tall trees.

Have you been here before?

Yes.

When? When were you born?

Long ago.

Where? When?

 

Tell me, Madeleine. Tell me.

No.

Why did you jump.

I didn’t jump, I fell.

Why did you jump.

I can’t tell you.

Who told you to jump. What? What?

Don’t ask me. Please don’t ask me. Take me away from here.

 

 

 

Every dimension presupposes a medium within which it can act, and if, in the spiral unwinding of things, space warps into something akin to time, and time, in its turn, warps into something akin to thought, then, surely, another dimension follows—a special Space maybe, not the old one, we trust, unless spirals become vicious circles again.

 

 

 

He is the event that alters place he says.

 

 

 

As the world turns, any line drawn from pole to pole may serve as well as any other for a starting line of reference. The placement of the prime meridian is a purely political decision.

 

 

 

The streak of sun widens.

Lights up the dim pine trees.

The almond trees.

The whole mountainside.

 

 

The measurement of longitude meridians, in comparison, is tempered by time. To learn one’s longitude at sea, one needs to know what time it is aboard ship and also the time at the home port or another place of known longitude—at that very same moment. The two clock times enable the navigator to convert the hour difference into a geographical separation.

 

 

 

The sun draws shadows over the red earth.

The dried brown grass.

 

 

The active quest for a solution to the problem of longitude persisted over four centuries and across the whole continent of Europe. Renowned astronomers approached the longitude challenge by appealing to the clockwork universe. Palatial observatories were founded at Paris, London, and Berlin for the express purpose of determining longitude by the heavens.

 

 

Four months of flight.

 

 

English clockmaker John Harrison, a mechanical genius who pioneered the science of portable precision timekeeping, devoted his life to this quest. He accomplished what Newton had feared was impossible: He invented a clock that would carry the true time from the home port, like an eternal flame, to any remote corner of the world.

 

 

Hot. Heavy air. As if the whole valley awaited the thunder.

 

 

“Yes,” he continued, with a contemptuous smile, “the blowing up of the first meridian is bound to raise a howl of execration.”

 

 

You drive through the mountain landscape. The high mountainsides.

Into a quarry.

See a baby owl sitting on the fence.

 

 

He thus disclosed the innocent Stevie, seated very good and quiet at a deal table, drawing circles, circles; innumerable circles, concentric, eccentric; a coruscating whirl of circles that by their tangled multitude of repeated curves, uniformity of form and confusion of intersecting lines suggested a rendering of cosmic chaos, the symbolism of a mad art attempting the inconceivable.

 

 

It flies away as you approach.

The carved-out yellow mountainside shines in the twilight.

 

 

One fell to musing before the phenomenon—even of the past; of South America, a continent of crude sunshine and brutal revolutions, of the sea, the vast expanse of salt waters, the mirror of heaven’s frowns and smiles, the reflector of the world’s light.

 

You hear the wind.

 

 

Then the vision of an enormous town presented itself, of a monstrous town more populous than some continents and in its man-made might as if indifferent to heaven’s frowns and smiles; a cruel devourer of the world’s light. There was room enough there to place any story, depth enough there for any passion, variety enough there for any setting, darkness enough to bury five million lives.

 

 

You see it move the trees.

 

 

On the 15th of February, 1894, Martial Bourdin, a French anarchist, tries to blow up the Observatory in Greenwich Park in London. The bomb goes off too soon, and he dies of his wounds in the park thirty minutes later.

 

You didn’t know where tears were to be found. Where in the night. Where in morning.

 

She was in the dark as to the inwardness of the word “Shame.”

And she said placidly: “Come along Stevie. You can’t help that.”

 

It was as though he had been trying to fit all the words he could remember to his sentiments in order to get some sort of corresponding idea. And, as a matter of fact, he got it at last. He hung back to utter it at once:

“Bad world for poor people.”

“Beastly,” he added concisely.

 

 

No he says that M replied.

 

 

Who Killed Cock Robin?

Who caught him with a shot and put him on the spot?

Who Killed Cock Robin? And vanished like a phantom in the night?

WHO?

 

 

Who killed Cock Robin?

I, said the Sparrow,

with my bow and arrow,

I killed Cock Robin.

Who saw him die?

I, said the Fly,

with my little eye,

I saw him die.

Who caught his blood?

I, said the Fish,

with my little dish,

I caught his blood.

Who’ll make the shroud?

I, said the Beetle,

with my thread and needle,

I’ll make the shroud.

 

 

The difference between the images of the battle which he had in his head and what he now saw before him as evidence that the battle had in fact taken place occasioned in him a sense of confusion such as he had never previously experienced. A sort of vertigo.

 

 

You lay down on the asphalt beside him on the mountain road.

 

 

 

Wait for him to catch his breath.

 

 

In the distance, we heard the Goddess of Democracy crash to the ground. Everyone yelled, “Down with Fascism!” Red signal flares shot into the sky, and suddenly the troops lined up directly opposite us. A dozen soldiers lay down on their stomachs, pointed machine guns at us and placed their fingers on the triggers.

 

“The people will be victorious!” my mother yells. “Down with Fascism!”

 

 

The taps didn’t quite close any more.

But she listened as if trying to trap what?

The point between stillness and motion?

The birth of gravity?

Degrees of tension and attention?

Then she pushed her hair back

with the fluttering motion of her arm

and turned again

slowly, round and round

counter-clockwise, like water swirling, turns and more turns.

 

 

I see scenes of a bygone war: the assault on the pass—Vall’Inferno—the 26th of May, 1915. Bursts of gunfire in the mountains and a forest shot to shreds. Rain hatches the window-panes. The train changes track at points. The pallid glow of arc-lamps suffuses the compartment. We stop at the Brenner. No one gets out and no one gets in. The frontier guards in their gray greatcoats pace to and fro on the platform. We remain there for at least a quarter of an hour. Across on the other side are the silver ribbons of the rails.

 

 

You sense the stillness in the mountains.

 

 

The rain turns to snow. And a heavy silence lies upon the place, broken only by the bellowing of some nameless animals waiting in a siding to be transported onwards. It lasts much longer, the night of time than the day of time, and no one knows when day will break.

 

 

The hot asphalt against your back.

 

 

I feel a wisp of dawn light fall on my eyelids. My body is like a bird’s nest that’s fallen to the ground.

 

 

He’ll leave Athens tomorrow he says.

 

 

I’m not sure whether my eyes are open yet or not. All I can see are splinters of light, like those that scatter across a lake when you try to scoop out the reflection of the moon.

 

 

 


“Nollmeridianen” by Marie Silkeberg

 

 

 

blood – your life depends upon lying close

 

 

 

Your flesh and spirit are still alive, buried inside the coffin of your skin.

 

 

Jag gick ut på Changan Avenue, och såg en lång vägg av gröna soldater igen. Allt var grönt: soldaterna, stridsvagnarna, byggnaderna på båda sidor om dem. Himlen var grön, och solen ännu grönare… Mitt skelett skakades av en bultspik av smärta. Jag hade också träffats… Varmt, klibbigt blod rann över mitt ansikte. Min hand sträckte sig för att röra vid mitt huvud, men kunde inte hitta det…

 

 

Tidig morgon. Solen har inte ens gått upp. Dess strålar syns över västra bergen.

 

 

Vi befinner oss nu, fortsatte han på det omständliga sätt som karakteriserade honom, vi befinner oss nu i närheten av den norska kusten, på den sextioåttonde breddgraden, i det stora landskapet Nordland, närmare bestämt Lofotens dystra distrikt. Berget på vars topp vi befinner oss är Helseggen – Den Töckniga.

 

 

Du känner kylan i morgonen.

Fortfarande inget ljud från M.

Den 14:e på kvällen gick han svag. Sjuk.Till fängelset på Rhodos.

Efter åtta timmars bussresa från Istanbul till Izmir.

Och sedan längre söderut. En båt som tog honom till Rhodos. Ön med fjärilsdalen.

 

 

Sommarskymning. Tid: en oklar tidpunkt under det första decenniet av det här impopulära århundradet. Plats: från er ekvator 59 nordlig latitud, från min skrivhand 100 östlig longitud.

 

 

Du minns fjärilarna som en stor fladdrande färgupplevelse.

 

 

 

Medan den gamle talade blev jag varse ett högt och successivt tilltagande ljud, påminnande om det dova dånet från en stor buffelhjord över en amerikansk prärie; och i samma ögonblick såg jag hur den, som sjömännen kallar det, krabba karaktären i havet nedanför oss nu snabbt övergick i en ström som gick östvart.

 

 

Och sedan många år senare. Båten ni åkte när han sov i ditt knä.

Du satt i aktern. Lyssnade på motorerna.

Förstod inte att det var ett återseende förrän ni var mitt i dalen.

 

 

Inför mina ögon antog denna ström en fruktansvärd hastighet. För varje sekund tilltog dess fart, dess otyglade våldsamhet. På fem minuter var hela fjärden ända bort till Værøy i rasande uppror. Men det var mellan Mosken och kusten som vattnet rasade som värst. Där välvde sig de väldiga vattenmassorna in i och bröt mot varandra, sprang ut i plötsliga ursinniga konvulsioner – hävde sig, kokade, fräste – och roterade runt i otaliga stora virvlar; och alltsammans strömmade östvart med en hastighet som vatten annars aldrig antar utom i stora vattenfall.

 

 

sick

det står stilla i

luften

 

 

The feeling of the singing of the real world.

If only I could catch the feeling of the singing of the real world.

 

 

Solens rand nu helt försvunnen. Men ännu inte helt mörkt.

 

 

Här ligger den verkliga, orubbliga skillnaden mellan latitud och longitud, utöver den ytliga olikhet som ett barn kan se: nollparallellen är fastlagd av naturens lagar, nollmeridianen flyttar sig likt tidens sand.

 

 

Inget sms om att M hört av sig.Tre dagar sa han säger du i telefonen.

Börja inte oroa dig förrän imorgon.

 

 

 

Oh no … our world is only a bad mood of God, a bad day of his.

Then there is hope outside this manifestation of the world that we know?

Oh plenty of hope, an infinite amount of hope – but not for us.

 

 

Dimman tät över bergen.

 

 

4 mars. I dag, då den nordliga brisen märkbart avtog, tog jag ur rockfickan upp en vit näsduk, i avsikt att skarva vårt segel med den. Nu-Nu satt bredvid mig, och då näsduken av en tillfällighet fladdrade mot hans ansikte, greps han av våldsamma krampanfall. De följdes av slöhet och dåsighet och han mumlade lågt: Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!

 

 

 

Ingen måne i kväll. Inga stjärnor.

 

 

 

Söndagen den 28 september 1889 samlades representanter från arton länder i Sèvres utanför Paris. De skulle föra in världen under ett metermått känt som M, ett kilo känt som K, och ge deras välsignelse till en bestämd linjal och en bestämd vikt…

 

 

Stenbyggnaden. En febrig tanke.

 

 

Klockan halv två den eftermiddagen la representanterna de ”utvalda” M och K i ett kassaskåp med tredubbla lås. Vid det ögonblicket blev M och K – två av de mest precist utformade och mätta objekten i historien, de två mest individuellt människoskapade tingen – genom att begravas de mest universella. M som en meter, inte mer, inte mindre. Från den togs längden ut till varje annan längd i världen.

 

En plötslig trötthet kommer över dig igen.

 

Documentary. A slice of your orange.

 

Som om kroppen inte kan vakna till kroppens tid.

 

Mest av allt ville de standardisera tiden. Från en huvudklocka i kontrollrummet i självaste Parisobservatoriet, vid Rue du Télégraphe, förde ledningar pulsslag av luft – det vill säga, av tid – under gatorna för att ställa klockorna i hela staden…

 

Skymningstid. Bara en smal strimma av solen nu kvar.

 

 

…det brittiska systemet av undervattenskablar för att sammanbinda klockorna i nationens enorma imperium. När en kabel nådde Recifes stränder i Brasilien, kom kejsar Pedro II ner till stranden för att bevittna ankomsten av den europeiska tiden. Tid synkroniserad med klotets nollpunkt, det kungliga observatoriet i Greenwich.

 

 

Syrsorna börjar.

 

 

Men den aldrig avstannande expansionen av den tidsenande zonen fortsatte. Kablar slingrade sig under havsytan ner längs Afrikas västkust, landade i de koloniala huvudstäderna, som Dakar. Den korsade haven och rörde sig upp mot Anderna, vindlade mot Hai Phongs hamn… Överallt dit telegrafkablarna kunde nå, dit nådde tidssignalerna också. Tid, vikt och längd började täcka klotet: en planetarisk maskin som skulle föra in världen under en enda tickande klocka.

 

 

Du vaknar av meddelandet att M nu är på en båt.

Släppt ur Rhodos fängelse. Snart anländer till Pireus – Atens hamn.

 

 

 

Aldrig ska jag glömma den känsla av bävan, fasa och förundran som fyllde mig när jag såg mig omkring. Båten tycktes hänga, som på något magiskt sätt, halvvägs ned på insidan av en tratt med ofattbar omkrets och ett skrämmande djup. Dess helt släta sidor hade kunnat tas för ebenholts om det inte varit för den förvirrande fart de spann runt med, och för det förfärande skimmer de blänkte med, som kom av fullmånens strålar som flödade ned genom öppningen i molnen jag nämnde, underbart glittrande längs de svarta väggarna, långt ned i avgrundens innersta prång.

 

 

Du hör tuppen.

 

 

22 mars. Mörkret hade djupnat än mer, och det skingrades nu blott av vattnets mjölkiga sken, som återkastades av den vita töckenslöjan framför oss. Jättelika blekvita fåglar flögo nu ständigt fram bak slöjan och deras läte var det eviga tekeli-li, då de försvunno från vår anblick.

 

 

Tre motorcyklar kör förbi.

 

 

Därvid rörde sig Nu-Nu på båtens botten, men då vi kände på honom, funno vi att hans själ hade flytt. Och nu ilade vi rätt in i katarakten, och ett svalg upplät sig i den till vårt mottagande.

 

 

En krypande skräck kom över dig mot kvällen.

 

 

 

Men i vår väg trädde en beslöjad skepnad, till sin resning vida större än någon som dväljes ibland människor. Och skepnaden var till sitt anletes färg fulländat vit som snö.

 

 

 

Att han ska fastna i ett läger.

 

Tvingas lämna sina fingeravtryck.

 

 

Dessa bilder av ogenomtränglig vithet behöver kontextualiseras för att förklara deras enastående styrka, mönster och konsekvens. För de uppstår alltid i nära anslutning till framställningar av svarta eller afrikanska människor som är döda, maktlösa eller under total kontroll, dessa bilder av förblindande vithet tycks fungera både som motgift mot och begrundan av den skugga som är denna vithets följeslagare – en mörk, vilande närvaro som rör den amerikanska litteraturens hjärta och texter med rädsla och längtan.

 

 

Klockans hjärta säger han.

Solens.

 

Vem som helst på den norra hemisfären kunde bestämma sin latitud – hur många grader söder om Nordpolen de befann sig – bara genom att observera Polstjärnan. Men longituden – hur långt öster eller väster de var från sin referenspunkt (t ex London eller Paris) var mycket svårare. För att kunna mäta hur långt öster- eller västerut man var, var man, eftersom jorden roterar, tvungen att simultant jämföra stjärnorna ovan sig med stjärnorna över referenspunkten.

 

 

Det är därför hoppet måste ligga utanför ”oss själva”

vi måste återskapa en förbindelse

till den materiella världen

även till oss själva

 

 

 

 

 

Du körde genom mörkret på bergsvägarna.

 

 

Efter ett tag blev jag besatt av en djup nyfikenhet på virveln själv. Jag kände verkligen en uppriktig önskan att få utforska dess djup.

 

 

 

 

Vulkanaska säger han. Den svarta stenen. Strimmorna.

 

 

 

M:s ögon.Trötta. Rödkantade. Uppspärrade. På fotografiet han visar dig.

 

 

 

Hur det i samhällen som en förkänsla av stora omvälvande händelser kan uppstå ett formlöst, till vad som helst formbart tomrum – det kommer nu en tid av fullkomlig sammanhangslöshet, inga ord svarar längre mot vad de förut betecknade, tiden har öppnat sig som ett svalg, allt glider, allt är en mörkt och oredigt flytande ström vars hastighet bara tilltar men utan mål, spillror och splittror virvlar fram över mörkret, vad mörkrets malström i verkligheten innehåller kan ingen säga.

 

 

Old.

Old some two thousand years or more.

The oldest living things.

You’ve never been here before?

No.

What do you think?

… people who were born and have died when the trees went on living.

Their true name is Always green. Ever living.

I don’t like them.

Why?

 

Somewhere here I was born. And there I died. It was only a moment for you.

You. You took no notice.

 

Madeleine …

Madeleine. Where are you now?

Here with you.

Where?

Tall trees.

Have you been here before?

Yes.

When? When were you born?

Long ago.

Where? When?

 

Tell me Madeleine. Tell me.

No.

Why did you jump.

I didn’t jump. I fell.

Why did you jump.

I can’t tell you.

Who told you to jump. What? What?

Don’t ask me. Please don’t ask me. Take me away from here.

 

 

 

Varje dimension förutsätter nämligen ett medium inom vilket det kan fungera, och om i tingens spiralformade upprullning rummet vävs in i något som är besläktat med tiden och tiden i sin tur vävs in i något som är besläktat med tanken, då följer förstås ännu en dimension – ett speciellt Rum kanske, inte det gamla, tror vi, om inte spiraler ska bli onda cirklar igen.

 

 

 

Han är den händelse som förändrar platsen säger han.

 

 

 

Eftersom jorden vrider sig kan vilken linje som helst som går från pol till pol vara den referenslinje man utgår ifrån. Var nollmeridianen placeras är ett rent politiskt beslut.

 

 

 

Solstrimman blir bredare.

Lyser upp de dova barrträden.

Mandelträden.

Hela bergssidan.

 

 

Att fastställa meridianerna är i ordets egentliga bemärkelse en tidsfråga. För att veta på vilken längdgrad man befinner sig till havs måste man veta hur mycket klockan just i det ögonblicket är ombord och i hemmahamnen eller på någon annan plats vars meridian man känner till. Tack vare dessa båda tidsangivelser kan navigatören räkna om tidsskillnaden till ett geografiskt avstånd.

 

 

 

Solen tecknar skuggor över den röda jorden.

Det torra bruna gräset.

 

 

I mer än 400 år och över hela den europeiska kontinenten sökte man aktivt efter en lösning på longitudproblemet. Namnkunniga astronomer nalkades longitudens utmaning genom att betrakta universum som ett urverk. Palatsliknande observatorier grundades i Paris, London och Berlin i det uttryckliga syftet att himlakropparna skulle fastställa longituden.

 

 

Fyra månader av flykt.

 

 

Den engelske urmakaren John Harrison, ett geni på mekanik som banade vägen för den bärbara precisionskronometern, ägnade hela sitt liv åt detta arbete. Han uppnådde vad Newton hade fruktat var omöjligt och konstruerade ett ur som skulle föra hemmahamnens tid som en evig låga till världens alla hörn.

 

 

Hett. Kvavt. Som om hela dalen väntar på åskan.

 

 

Just det, fortsatte han med ett föraktfullt leende, ett bombattentat mot nollmeridianen skulle säkert få folk att skria till himlen.

 

 

Ni kör genom bergslandskapet. De höga bergssidorna.

In i ett stenbrott.

Ser en uggleunge sitta på stängslet.

 

 

Därmed avslöjade han stackars Stevie, som satt där snäll och tyst vid ett bord och ritade cirklar, cirklar, cirklar; oräkneliga cirklar, koncentriska, excentriska; en virvlande malström av cirklar som med sin tilltrasslade mångfald av ständigt återkommande form och sitt sätt att skära in över varandra förde tanken till ett kosmiskt kaos, symboliken hos en vansinneskonst som försökte nå det ouppnåeliga.

 

 

Den flyger bort när ni närmar er.

De gula uthuggna bergssidorna lyser i skymningen.

 

 

Jag började grubbla över fenomenet – och tankarna gick också till det förflutna; till Sydamerika, en kontinent med intensiv sol och brutala revolutioner, till havet, dessa väldiga vidder av saltvatten, spegeln för himlens bistra och leende uppsyner, återspeglaren av världens ljus.

 

Du hör vinden.

 

 

Sedan kom synen av en väldig stad, av en monstruös stad med fler invånare än vissa kontinenter och i sin människoskapade storhet liksom likgiltig för himlens bisterhet och leenden, en grym uppslukare av världens ljus. Där fanns förvisso plats nog för vilken sorts historia som helst, djup nog för vilka lidelser som helst, omväxling nog för vilket miljöval som helst, mörker nog för att begrava fem miljoner liv.

 

 

Ser den röra träden.

 

 

Martial Bourdin, en fransk anarkist, försöker den 15 februari 1894 att spränga Observatoriet i Greenwich Park i London, men bomben utlöses för tidigt, i parken, och han dör av skadorna trettio minuter senare.

 

Du visste inte var gråten var. I natten. I morgonen.

 

She was in the dark as to the inwardness of the word ”Shame”.

And she said placidly: ”Come along Stevie. You can’t help that.”

 

Det var som om han försökte sätta ihop alla ord för känslor som han kunde minnas i någon ordning för att få en sammanhängande tanke. Och, faktiskt, fick han det till sist. Han vände sig om för att yttra dem omedelbart:

”Bad world for poor people.”

”Beastly”, he added concisely.

 

 

Nej säger han att M svarade.

 

 

Who Killed Cock Robin?

Who caught him with a shot and put him on the spot?

Who Killed Cock Robin? And vanished like a phantom in the night?

WHO?

 

 

Who killed Cock Robin?

I, said the Sparrow,

with my bow and arrow,

I killed Cock Robin.

Who saw him die?

I, said the Fly,

with my little eye,

I saw him die.

Who caught his blood?

I, said the Fish,

with my little dish,

I caught his blood.

Who’ll make the shroud?

I, said the Beetle,

with my thread and needle,

I’ll make the shroud.

 

 

Skillnaden mellan de bilder av slaget som han bar i sitt huvud och det som han nu såg utbrett framför sig som bevis för att slaget verkligen hade ägt rum, den skillnaden orsakade en irritation som han dittills aldrig hade känt, ett slags svindel.

 

 

Du lägger dig på asfalten bredvid honom på krönet av backen.

 

 

 

Väntar på att han ska hämta andan.

 

 

I fjärran hörde vi Frihetsgudinnan falla mot marken och gå sönder. Alla skrek, ”Ner med fascismen!”. Röda signalraketer sköts mot himlen, och plötsligt ställde sig trupper upp på rad mitt emot oss. Ett dussin soldater låg ner på magen, riktade sina k-pistar emot oss och placerade fingrarna på avtryckarna.

 

”Folket ska segra!” skriker min mamma. ”Ner med fascismen!”

 

 

Kranarna kunde inte längre stängas av ordentligt.

Men hon lyssnade som för att försöka uppfånga vad?

Punkten mellan stillhet och rörelse?

Gravitationens födelse?

Grader av spänning och uppmärksamhet?

Sedan förde hon håret bakåt

med en fladdrande rörelse med armen

och svängde runt igen

långsamt, runt och runt

motsols, som virvlande vatten, varv efter varv.

 

 

Jag ser bilder från ett svunnet krig. Erövringen av passhöjden – Vall’Inferno – den 26 maj 1915. Eldkärvar i bergen och en sönderskjuten skog. Fönstren streckas av regn. Tåget växlar spår. Det bleka skenet från båglamporna faller in i kupén. Vi stannar i Brenner. Ingen stiger av och ingen stiger på. Gränsvakterna går av och an i sina gråa överrockar på perrongen. En kvart minst varar uppehållet. Där borta på andra sidan de silverfärgade skenorna.

 

 

Känner stillheten i bergen.

 

 

Regnet övergår i snö. Och en tung tystnad vilar över området, bruten endast av råmandet från namnlösa djur som på något uppställningsspår i mörkret väntar på att transporteras vidare. Den varar vida längre, tidens natt, än tidens dag, och ingen vet när dagjämningen var.

 

 

Den heta asfalten mot ryggen.

 

 

Jag känner en strimma gryningsljus falla över mina ögonlock. Min kropp är som ett fågelbo som har fallit mot marken.

 

 

Han lämnar Aten i morgon säger han.

 

 

Jag är inte säker på om mina ögon är öppna än eller inte. Allt jag kan se är skärvor av ljus, likt dem som sprider sig över en sjö när man försöker gröpa ur månens spegling.

 

 

 


“Bárðarbunga” by Marie Silkeberg,
Translated from the Swedish by Kelsi Vanada

 

 

A blue sulfur fog from the eruption lies over the city.

A thin haze.

You smell sulfur even in the shower.

See low houses made of wood. Corrugated metal.

A small plane flies in for a landing.

It rains.

You get soaking wet.

Eat noodle soup.

The meat tastes different. Denser.

You hear them speak in Chinese as the rain pours down outside.

You walk out into it.

Ask about the boat.

We’ll get back to you the woman answers.

 

You see the whale meat’s blood-red color in the display case.

Try to drink coffee outside in the harbor and smoke

the only cigarette left in your pocket.

The rain whips in from the sea.

 

You swim in a large outdoor swimming pool.

A long time.

As if through the volcano.

The lava streams.

 

Epilepsy. Visions.

A blue juice.

 

A woman starts talking to you in the dressing room.

Says she recognizes you. Has seen you often.

 

It’s my first time you say.

 

You see a rainbow across the sky.

A film about the ocean you say.

How the island lies in the ocean.

Deep in our memory.

 

You meet a woman from Uruguay.

With grandparents from Poland and Hungary.

Now living in Australia.

She tells you that outside the apartment she rents

garbage piles up.

One morning she saw a woman up to her waist in the mountain of trash.

Using a tool to scoop something edible out of it.

 

A man and a woman from Montreal next to you stiffen.

Really?

Wealth has returned hasn’t it they say.

 

Could they have done something better you ask a woman.

2008.

Something more radical she answers.

 

You walk to the flea market in a large shed.

See hand-knit sweaters. Bracelets of lava stones.

 

The books in the river. Tinged blue from the ink.

You’re thinking.

Remembering.

The devastated city.

 

The stage’s memory she says.

The ghost in Hamlet.

How it should be interpreted for the deaf.

Only later you think you confused the sounds.

A theater for the dead.

 

An analogy between gift, loss, and spectacle she says.

When you give what is most precious to you.

You become nothing.

 

You see the glass greenhouses. Warmed with steam.

How they glow in the dark landscape.

The biggest desert in Europe he says.

Lava fields.

Two thousand or twenty thousand big or small earthquakes per week.

 

Continental plates.

They slide apart at two centimeters per year he says.

As you pass over the crevice between the Eurasian

and the American.

In other places they converge he says.

At the Himalayas for example.

 

The longest period without sun since records began.

But you don’t hear in which decade or century.

 

You wait a long time for the geyser to jet.

At last it does.

Jets.

In the downpour.

You take a step back when it happens.

 

See the bubble expanding seconds prior.

Smell the sulfur.

The waterfall.

Cascades.

The huge mist of water droplets.

 

You think about the similarities between Japan and Iceland.

If similarities exist.

 

No boats departing tonight for the northern lights.

A woman calls to say.

 

The hottest place on earth he says.

Under the glaciers.

Exploding lava when the volcano erupts.

 

And the melting glacier flows down into the crater.

 

Or the lava that flowed into the lake and was cooled down.

Was so hot that it became so light that it could float on water.

 

A new continent she said.

A new way of living.

Not a country.

A city.

The bottom of a deep fjord.

The land-raising is still ongoing.

 

You see a brimstone butterfly at Eyjafjallajökull.

The whole summer of 2010 I drove through black clouds he says.

 

Two lava streams. One on each side of the village.

Do the Japanese care about the French Revolution you think.

When he tells you it’s said the big eruption of 1780

triggered the Revolution.

The famine it caused in Europe.

Long years of black clouds covering half the continent.

 

You arrive at a black lava beach full of huge ice blocks.

 

Nowhere.

You reach Antarctica.

If you go straight south he says.

 

A Japanese woman falls asleep on the bus. Then another.

They look like people in the subway in Tokyo.

In their heavy sleep.

 

Hong Kong she says they come from when you finally ask.

 

You don’t want to be in the rain a minute longer.

But change your mind when you enter the room.

Run toward the boat.

Just before it casts off into the dark.

Reykjavik disappears.

The rain ceases.

The cold intensifies.

But you notice it only later. When the cold has pervaded your body.

Strangely happy.

You listen to the captain as he reads in his Icelandic accent

 

blush upon the cheek of night

posthumous, unearthly light

 

You circle.

Stop still.

Nothing happens.

People go below deck.

Fall asleep across the table.

You go up again.

The northern lights the captain says at your side.

Points.

Can you see it?

A white cloud. Barely.

Maybe.

I’m used to it he says.

That’s why.

I see the activity.

 

How many hours of time difference you think.

How hours are counted.

From a place that’s still young.

Geologically speaking.

 

Short minutes of joy are so rare now he writes.

Russia is reaching hell in full rage.

 

A fontanelle you think.

Where the world opens. Upward. On the globe.

Rotating continuously. In its gravity.

 

Eat it with your mouth closed the host says.

About the rotten shark.

Let your tongue taste it.

 

And let the taste rise into your forehead.

Chug the liquor.

Down the whole glass.


“Bárðarbunga” by Marie Silkeberg

 

 

En blå dimma av svavel från utbrottet ligger över staden.

Ett tunt dis.

Du känner lukten av svavel också i duschen.

Ser låga hus av trä. Korrugerad plåt.

Ett litet plan flyger in för landning.

Det regnar.

Du blir genomblöt.

Du äter nudelsoppa.

Köttet smakar annorlunda. Tyngre.

Du lyssnar till det kinesiska språket medan regnet öser ner utanför.

Du går ut i det.

Frågar om båten.

Vi hör av oss svarar kvinnan.

 

Du ser den blodiga röda färgen i valköttet i kyldisken.

Försöker dricka kaffe utomhus i hamnen och röka

den enda cigaretten som du har kvar i fickan.

Regnet piskar in från havet.

 

Du simmar i en stor utomhusbassäng.

Länge.

Som genom vulkanen.

I lavaströmmar.

 

Epilepsi. Syner.

En blå dryck.

 

En kvinna börjar tala med dig i omklädningsrummet.

Säger att hon känner igen dig. Sett dig ofta.

 

Det är första gången säger du.

 

Du ser en regnbåge över himlen.

En film om havet säger du.

Hur ön ligger i havet.

Deep in our memory.

 

Du träffar en kvinna från Uruguay.

Med far- och morföräldrar från Polen och Ungern.

Som nu bor i Australien.

Hon berättar att det utanför lägenheten hon hyr

ligger högar med sopor.

Att hon en morgon såg en kvinna stå till midjan i sopberget.

Att hon använde ett redskap för att skyffla fram något ätbart ur det.

 

En man och en kvinna från Montreal bredvid er stelnar till.

Really?

Det verkar ju som om välståndet kommit tillbaka säger de.

 

Hade de kunnat göra något bättre frågar du en kvinna.

2008.

Något radikalare svarar hon.

 

Du går till loppmarknaden i en stor barack.

Ser tröjor. Armband av lavastenar.

 

Böckerna i floden. Helt blå av bläcket tänker du.

Minns du.

Staden som utplånades.

 

Scenens minne säger hon.

Spöket i Hamlet.

Hur det ska tolkas för döva.

Först senare tänker du att du förväxlade ljuden.

En teater för de döda.

 

En analogi mellan gåva förlust och skådespel säger hon.

When you give what is most precious to you.

You become nothing.

 

Du ser drivhusen av glas. Uppvärmda av ångan.

Hur de lyser i det mörka landskapet.

Den största öknen i Europa säger han.

Lavafälten.

Tvåtusen eller tjugotusen små eller stora jordbävningar i veckan.

 

Kontinentalplattor.

De glider isär med två centimeter per år.

Medan ni rör er över skrevan mellan den euroasiatiska

och den amerikanska.

På andra platser närmar de sig varandra säger han.

Vid Himalaya t ex.

 

Den längsta perioden utan sol sedan man började räkna.

Men du hör inte i vilket decennium eller århundrade.

 

Du väntar länge på att gejsern ska stråla.

Till sist gör den det.

Strålar.

I hällregnet.

Du tar ett steg bakåt när det händer.

 

Ser den växande bubblan sekunderna innan.

Känner sulfatlukten.

Vattenfallet.

Vattenkaskaderna.

Den stora dimman av vattendroppar.

 

Likheten mellan Japan och Island tänker du på.

Om likheter finns.

 

Inte i kväll heller åker båten ut mot norrskenet.

Ringer en kvinna och säger.

 

Den hetaste platsen på jorden säger han.

Under glaciären.

Exploderande lava när vulkanen får ett utbrott.

 

Och det smälta glaciärvattnet strömmar ner i kratern.

 

Eller den lava som flödat ner i sjön och kylts ner.

Varit så het att den varit så lätt att den flutit på vattnet.

 

En ny kontinent sa hon.

Ett sätt att leva.

Inte ett land.

En stad.

Bottnen av en djup fjord.

Landhöjningen pågår fortfarande.

 

 

Du ser en citronfjäril vid Eyjafjallajökull.

Hela sommaren 2010 åkte jag genom svarta moln säger han.

 

Två flöden. På var sin sida om byn.

Bryr sig japaner om den franska revolutionen tänker du.

När han berättar att det sägs att det stora utbrottet 1780

var orsak till revolutionen.

Hungern det skapade i Europa.

De långa åren av svarta moln som täckte halva kontinenten.

 

Ni kommer till en svart lavastrand full av stora isblock.

 

Nowhere.

Till Antarktis kommer man.

Om man åker rakt söderut säger han.

 

Den japanska kvinnan somnar i bussen. Sedan en till.

De ser ut som människorna i Tokyos tunnelbana.

Den djupa sömnen.

 

Hong Kong säger hon att de kommer ifrån när du till sist frågar.

 

Du vill inte vara i regnet en minut till.

Men ändrar dig när du kommer in i rummet.

Springer mot båten.

Hinner precis innan den lägger ut i mörkret.

Reykjavik försvinner.

Regnet upphör.

Kylan tilltar.

Men du märker det först senare. När kylan gått in i kroppen.

Är märkligt lycklig.

Du lyssnar på kaptenen när han läser med sin isländska accent

 

blush upon the cheek of night

posthumous, unearthly light

 

Ni kretsar.

Står stilla.

Inget händer.

Folk går ner under däck.

Somnar rakt över borden.

Du går ut igen.

The northern light säger kaptenen och ställer sig bredvid dig.

Pekar.

Can you see it?

Ett vitt moln ser du bara.

Kanske.

Jag är van säger han.

Det är därför.

Jag ser aktiviteten.

 

Hur många timmars tidsskillnad tänker du.

Hur timmarna räknas.

Från en plats som fortfarande är ung.

I geologisk mening.

 

Short minutes of joy are so rare now skriver han.

Russia is reaching hell in full rage.

 

En fontanell tänker du.

Där världen öppnar sig. Uppåt. På klotet.

Som roterar oavbrutet. I sin gravitation.

 

Ät den med stängd mun säger värden.

Om den ruttna hajen.

Låt tungan smaka den.

 

Och smaken stiga upp i pannhålorna.

Svep brännvinet.

Drick hela glaset.


Marie Silkeberg is a Swedish poet, translator and poetry filmmaker living in Stockholm. Since her first book appeared in 1990, she has written eight collections of poetry, including 23:23 (2006), Material (2010) and, with Ghayath Almadhoun, Till Damaskus (2014). Atlantis (2017) is her newest book, and her most recent translations into Swedish are works of Inger Christensen and Claudia Rankine. She has taught, among other places, at Gothenburg University and the University of Southern Denmark.

Kelsi Vanada’s first translation, from the Spanish, is The Eligible Age by Berta García Faet, published in 2018 with Song Bridge Press; Toward Muteness is forthcoming from Veliz Books. She holds MFAs in Poetry (Iowa Writers’ Workshop, 2016) and Literary Translation (University of Iowa, 2017). She writes poems, translates from Spanish and collaboratively from Swedish, and works as Program Manager of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA).

☝ BACK TO TOP